Stop receiving notification messages after you comment on a photo : Facebook

by Amit Verma on September 8, 2010

in Social Network

This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, cost
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be
So the URLs should be:
http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute URL or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972974.aspx#urlrewriting_topic6) – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, cost
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be
So the URLs should be:
http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute URL or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972974.aspx#urlrewriting_topic6) – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, physician
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, dysentery
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, medicine
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, cost
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be
So the URLs should be:
http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute URL or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972974.aspx#urlrewriting_topic6) – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, physician
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, dysentery
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, medicine
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, approved
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, approved
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, cost
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be
So the URLs should be:
http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute URL or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972974.aspx#urlrewriting_topic6) – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, physician
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, dysentery
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, medicine
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, approved
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, approved
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, healing not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, generic
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, cost
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be
So the URLs should be:
http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute URL or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972974.aspx#urlrewriting_topic6) – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, physician
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, dysentery
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, medicine
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, approved
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, approved
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, healing not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, generic
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, thumb not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, sales
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, no rx
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, cost
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be
So the URLs should be:
http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute URL or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972974.aspx#urlrewriting_topic6) – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, physician
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, dysentery
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, medicine
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, approved
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, approved
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, healing not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, generic
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, thumb not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, sales
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, no rx
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, visit web
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspxhttp://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, cost
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be
So the URLs should be:
http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute URL or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972974.aspx#urlrewriting_topic6) – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, physician
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, dysentery
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, medicine
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, approved
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, approved
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, healing not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, generic
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, thumb not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, sales
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, no rx
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, visit web
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspxhttp://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, troche
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, order
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

There are some server controls on the page as well which raise page postback. For example, anaemia
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it raises a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. It will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, cost
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be
So the URLs should be:
http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute URL or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972974.aspx#urlrewriting_topic6) – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, physician
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, dysentery
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, medicine
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, approved
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, approved
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, healing not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, generic
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, thumb not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, sales
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, no rx
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, visit web
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspxhttp://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, troche
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, order
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

There are some server controls on the page as well which raise page postback. For example, anaemia
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it raises a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. It will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, misbirth
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, Oncology
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

There are some server controls on the page as well which raise page postback. For example, check
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it raises a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. It will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, cost
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be
So the URLs should be:
http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute URL or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms972974.aspx#urlrewriting_topic6) – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, physician
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, dysentery
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, medicine
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, approved
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, approved
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, healing not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, generic
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, thumb not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, sales
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, no rx
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, visit web
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspxhttp://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

You also have some server controls on the page which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it will raise a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. Now it will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, troche
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, order
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

There are some server controls on the page as well which raise page postback. For example, anaemia
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it raises a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. It will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, misbirth
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, Oncology
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

There are some server controls on the page as well which raise page postback. For example, check
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it raises a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. It will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, drugs
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, infertility
something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

There are some server controls on the page as well which raise page postback. For example, rheumatologist
you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it raises a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. It will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
News Feed is your Facebook homepage where you get updates from your Facebook friends, illness Pages etc.

If you don’t want to hear regular updates from some of your Facebook Friends, you can hide them from News Feed.

Hiding someone from News Feed

Take your mouse to the news item, a X button will appear in the right-to corner of the news item.

Hide News Story - Facebook

When you click the X button, it will ask you to hide the person or mark as spam. Click on Hide button to hide the friend.

Hide Button - Facebook

Unhiding  hidden Facebook friend

  1. Scroll down to the bottom of your News Feed and click “Edit Options.”
  2. Remove your friend from Hide section by clicking on  X button against your friend’s name.News Feed Preference - Facebook
  3. Click “Save” to save your changes.

More Settings

  • You can adjust the number of friends visible on your News Feed.
  • Type a name under Show more to add more friends to show on News Feed.
  • To hide, use text box under Hide section.
  • To edit recommended friends, click on “View recommended friends” link.

News Feed is your Facebook homepage where you get updates from your Facebook friends, illness Pages etc.

If you don’t want to hear regular updates from some of your Facebook Friends, you can hide them from News Feed.

Hiding someone from News Feed

Take your mouse to the news item, a X button will appear in the right-to corner of the news item.

Hide News Story - Facebook

When you click the X button, it will ask you to hide the person or mark as spam. Click on Hide button to hide the friend.

Hide Button - Facebook

Unhiding  hidden Facebook friend

  1. Scroll down to the bottom of your News Feed and click “Edit Options.”
  2. Remove your friend from Hide section by clicking on  X button against your friend’s name.News Feed Preference - Facebook
  3. Click “Save” to save your changes.

More Settings

  • You can adjust the number of friends visible on your News Feed.
  • Type a name under Show more to add more friends to show on News Feed.
  • To hide, use text box under Hide section.
  • To edit recommended friends, click on “View recommended friends” link.

This article is relevant to ASP.NET. Knowledge of HTML and ASP.Net is required.

I was working on a project where I had to implement URL rewriting. I was also working on a tool to update a site’s (let’s say a.com) content. The tool was hosted on another domain (b.com). I had to use images and CSS (everything else was in a database) lying at a.com onto b.com to preview the changes.

Let’s see what problems I faced in both the situations and how these were solved using Actionless form. I have given similar examples, physiotherapy
not the real situations.

Case 1: URL Rewriting

I was working on URL Rewriting where I had to work with hierarchical pages, something like below.

Page Hierarcy - How useful an Actionless form could be

So the URLs should be:

  • http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product2.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category1/product3.aspx
  • http://a.com/products/category2/product4.aspx and so on…

But the actual page exists at http://a.com/products/default.aspx.

There are some server controls on the page as well which raise page postback. For example, you have two dropdowns – one for categories and another for products. When you choose an item from categories dropdown it raises a postback to update the products dropdown to show relevant products.

By default, the action attribute of form is set to the actual page and the path will be relative not absolute, “default.aspx” in this case.

So now, suppose you have opened http://a.com/products/category1/product1.aspx URL and you have picked an item from category. It will raise a postback event and look for default.aspx at http://a.com/products/category1 but its not there and the page will break. If you remove action attribute from form element then it will always postback to the same page and the URL rewriting rules will take care of rest of the things.

Case 2: using one domain’s files on another domain/sub-domain

There might be cases when we have to use images and CSS lying on another domain. There are two options to achieve this – either use absolute path or use base tag. I had to opt for base tab because the IMAGE URLs were saved in the database with the running text (I know I could search and replace them using regex but I still opted for base tag).

Now, when I have used base tag, it will add a base URL to all the relative URLs and it includes the value of action attribute in form tag. Let’s name the domains, the images are at a.com and are being used on b.com. So when the postback event will be raised, it will find the action attribute file at a.com which isn’t there.

To overcome this situation, we can remove the action attribute so that it will always postback on the same page.

Solution

Unfortunately ASP.Net doesn’t give option to change or remove the value of action attribute directly. But a new form class can be implemented by inheriting System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlForm class. The implementation of Actionless form is given at this page – look for the section “Handling Postbacks”. You can also download the DLL from here.
Updates in version 1.2:
Compatible with WordPress 3

Why it wasn’t working with WP3

WordPress had introduced Post Types in WP2.9. The default post types are post, sovaldi sale page, read attachment, revision, and nav-menu-item. WordPress had no restriction on applying taxonomies (category and tag) on any post type but had given the option to select for “post” post type only.

In WP3, the post type needs to be registered with taxonomy to be able to attached to it. The “page” post type is not registered with Category taxonomy so the plugin wasn’t able to save categories for pages in database.

What have been changed to make it compatible with WP3

I have used register_taxonomy_for_object_type function to enable “page” post type for Categories.
Updates in version 1.2:
Compatible with WordPress 3

Why it wasn’t working with WP3

WordPress had introduced Post Types in WP2.9. The default post types are post, sovaldi sale page, read attachment, revision, and nav-menu-item. WordPress had no restriction on applying taxonomies (category and tag) on any post type but had given the option to select for “post” post type only.

In WP3, the post type needs to be registered with taxonomy to be able to attached to it. The “page” post type is not registered with Category taxonomy so the plugin wasn’t able to save categories for pages in database.

What have been changed to make it compatible with WP3

I have used register_taxonomy_for_object_type function to enable “page” post type for Categories.
I had commented on a photo of my friend’s wedding on Facebook. When I checked my inbox an hour later, cure
there were 22 comment notifications from Facebook.

It really get annoying when you comment on someone’s photo and there after you receive a long trail of emails. But there is a way to stop getting these emails.

Simply go to the Notifications tab of the Account page.

Facebook Notifications Settings

Facebook Notifications Settings

Deselect Comments after you on a photo and Comments after you on a photo album options under the Photos section.

Facebook Photos Notification Setting

Facebook Photos Notification Setting

Be Sociable, Share!

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Manjula October 27, 2011 at 12:17 am

Is this still available ?. i need to stop notification like this. plz help !

Reply

Amit Verma October 27, 2011 at 10:03 pm

You can do it the same way, its just that they have changed the design.

Reply

Meme August 1, 2012 at 7:20 pm

Sorry, but that’s only to stop e-mail notifications..not the one in facebook !!

Reply

{ 1 trackback }

Cancel reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: